The Obligatory CES Wrap Article

CES 2018 is in the bag. There were some highs and lows as the show continues to grow and slowly encompass the entire Vegas Strip. This is my unofficial awards ceremony for this years CES.

Most Omni-Present Tech

Google. Google, everywhere. This CES was definitely the battle of the virtual assistant market share and “hey google” was making a big splash. From wrapping the monorail to banners covering entire buildings to the oompa-loompah like assistants running all around the show it was hard to get away from Google. However, while Google had the crown for the most marketing materials it seemed like developers were leaning more towards Alexa in the vendor booths.

Runner Up (tie)

Screens. It’s no surprise for a show that started partially as a showcase for televisions that screens are still king at CES. From the massive LG OLED canyon to wafer thin screens that worn as watches, there were screens of all shapes, sizes and clarity were everywhere.

Robots. Every shape, style and size of robot was on display. From autonomous two wheel “tank” bots cruising the aisles to small desktop balancing robots responding to voice commands the robots were at CES in a big way this year. My personal favorite was Buddy, who looked like he came straight out of a Pixar movie.

Coolest Product

Yamaha Motoroid Motorcycle. Straight out of Akira and looking stupid fast even sitting still that bike was the slickest thing I saw at CES and I found myself constantly walking back to it.

Line I Wish I Stood In

Teslasuit. There were a lot of VR/AR experiences and a line to go with everyone of them. However, the standout seemed to be the Teslasuit full haptic feedback suit and I wish I would have experienced that one first hand. Next year.

Loudest Exhibit

BMW Driving Experience. Serving up more donuts than Dunkin, the perpetual drift track was as loud as it was impressive.

Most Impressive Demonstration

For this one you had to go to the mydevices suite in Mandalay Bay. If you were lucky enough to get invited you saw Benny Estes, product manager for mydevices put together a complete working sensor suite from scratch. Using auto-discovery and QR codes Benny took devices out of the box and had them online and reporting to a central dashboard in a matter of seconds. Truly inspiring to see how quickly you could deploy and the variety of sensors you can have available.

Party Crasher

Mother Nature.  In the first two days of CES Vegas get one quarter of their annual rainfall. Flooded parking garages, puddles and disabled outdoor escalators were just some of the downsides to this water show. Soggy shoes and walking 18,078 steps is a bad combo. The power outage in north hall on day 3 was also attributed to the rains.

Favorite Swag

There was a lot of the typical swag at CES this year, as to be expected, but for me a few booths stood out. CNET provided hand screened canvas bag made to order while you wait. I went with the timeless 70s logo, mainly because my other selection “so many gadgets, so little time” was too popular.

Strangest Product

A pill you ingest to help you predict and notify you when you are going to experience flatulence. Not sure if you get a text, or how you are notified of the pending eruption. Taking the Internet of Things a bit too far?


Security. This show is massive. Almost unimaginably massive. It has a footprint spanning from the LVCC to the Aria with stops everywhere in between, and is even larger if you count vendor suites. The security was amazing. Omnipresent, but not intrusive you were never far from help but also never standing in long lines for bag searches. Incredibly well choreographed and coordinated from the K9, to LVPD, to the convention center security they were hitting on all cylinders. #vegasstrong

Runner Up

Monorail.  My personal favorite mode of travel the monorail kept whisking attendants away to the next venue or to the after parties on a smooth schedule and even at peak hours never seemed over crowded.

Favorite Non-CES Moment

I ran into Caesar’s Forum shops to get out of the rain and saw an Optimus Prime sculpture in a storefront. I took a picture and sent it to my son, who is currently an Optimus fan. When I got home I asked if he got the picture and my son said that he had and asked me, “He’s not real, is he?” and thanks to being to CES 2018 I could answer the question truthfully, “Not yet.”

“HALT 2: Preparation is Everything” Published in both published and featured the second of a multi-part article “HALT 2: Preparation is Everything“, written by our very own Alan Brown, Marketing Communications Manager.  In it, he covers tips, tricks, and lessons learned as Technologic Systems prepared for and underwent HALT.  Be sure to take a look!

HALT 2: Preparation is Everything

“What is HALT?” Published in both published and featured the first of a multi-part article “What is HALT?“, written by our very own Alan Brown, Marketing Communications Manager.  In it, he introduces what HALT testing is, what it isn’t, and how it compares to other tests.  Be sure to take a look!

What is HALT?

IoT, Here We Come! Ubuntu Core Announced for TS-4900

In a joint press release between partners Canonical and Technologic Systems, the pairing of Ubuntu Core and TS-4900 was officially announced.

We couldn’t be more excited!

We feel that Ubuntu Core is going to make a big splash in the IoT world for its security, ease of management, and flexibility.  Combine that with our rock-solid, industrial TS-4900 and you have yourself a reliable, production-ready IoT device.

We’re very honored to be featured in the Ubuntu booth at the Mobile World Congress in 2017.  For more information, please take a look at the press release, Bringing Ubuntu Core to the i.MX6 Based TS-4900.  If that isn’t enough to quench your thirst, take a look at our Ubuntu Core Powered Embedded Systems page.


Reach Out and Touch Something (Capacitive vs Resistive Touch Screens)

You only have to go as far as your corner coffee shop to realize the new human-machine interface (HMI) preference is screens. From the touchscreen Point of Sale systems to the multitude of people interacting with their phones and mobile devices, screens are king. Industry is following suit and the choice for HMI is quickly migrating away from the keyboard and mouse and towards the screen. With the abundance of touch screens on the market and the decrease in costs there has been a marked increase in their market share and penetration. When picking a screen it’s important to determine which is better for your purposes: capacitive or resistive?

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Who’s (Not) Afraid of the Dark?


The Dark Side

Weather is inevitable, downtime shouldn’t be. Per Information Week, in 2015 IT downtime alone costs $26.5 Billion in lost revenue. This does not take into account the loss of customer confidence, productivity, and supply chain interruptions that are a result of these outages. In a constantly wired world, service level agreements (SLAs) with online availability requirements of >99.9% is today’s de-facto standard. It is simply a fact of the new business model that downtime is no longer acceptable. Industry has done what it can to protect itself from these outages as much as possible, and a few of those options are laid out below. But the result is the same, enterprise level businesses can no longer operate without disaster recovery plan with as many contingencies in place as possible to ensure minimal rebound and recovery time should an outage occur. With embedded electronics permeating further into our everyday lives, partially in thanks to the Internet of Things, there are more and more devices that we need to worry about recovering once the lights come back on. So what can you do to fend off the darkness?

Continue reading “Who’s (Not) Afraid of the Dark?”